Tense Affirmations

Common affirmations focus on the future. It’s about setting your sights on something you don’t have yet and embracing it. So many things go into thinking like this. Into learning how to think in the way affirmations demand. Part of that is the humble little tool of language. Language can take something vague and made […]



Common affirmations focus on the future. It’s about setting your sights on something you don’t have yet and embracing it.

So many things go into thinking like this.

Into learning how to think in the way affirmations demand.

Part of that is the humble little tool of language.

Language can take something vague and made it precise – real enough it feels like you’re holding it, tasting it on your tongue like it’s something smooth and strong.

Changing how you talk about something can change how it feels. For example, compare these two sentences:

“The gentleman sustained localised trauma from an impact with a minuscule projectile.”

And,

“Someone shot Dave.”

They both mean the same thing, if you think purely about the logic and information. But they don’t mean the same thing. One is boring while the other twists your guts.

Our brains process language on so many levels. Sure, there’s the literal level – what information is there. There’s also symbolism – a whole lot of that. Even saying there’s ‘lots’ of symbolism is metaphoric. It’s taking a description of physical things and applying it to abstract concepts.

There’s an emotional layer to language, of course. Someone can say all the right words in all the wrong tones and come off like a lunatic.

And there’s a greater social context. “How do you do?” means something different from British royalty than from a drunk teenager at a party.

There’s one thing you have to get right with language and affirmations – at least, according to the common take on it:

Tense.

Some folks will tell you they should always be in the present tense.

Others will say it’s all about the future tense.

If you’re not a grammar nerd, you don’t have to worry about any of that. You can follow that advice by starting any affirmation with one of these phrases:

“I am… “

“I will be… “

Whichever one you like best is fine.

See, I have a different take on affirmations. While some folks argue back and forth about present “I am” tense versus future “I will be” tense, I say there’s room for both.

If you’re just starting out with these, ask yourself: what feels better?

Does “I am rich” spark something deep in your chest?

Does “I will be loved” make you feel something stronger?

Maybe it’ll vary from topic to topic, like happiness feeling more real in the current moment.

I don’t know and I invite you to try it out.

Subscribe to the newsletter news

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

vgkeecom07-21
GB

Categories